The ZX80 Operating Manual

Sinclair ZX Spectrum
SYSTEM VARIABLES
The contents of the first 40 bytes of RAM are as follows. Some of the variables are 1 byte, and can be POKEd and PEEKed directly. The others are each 2 bytes, and have the low order byte at the given address (n, say) and the high order byte at the next address. Thus to poke value v at address n do

POKE n.v
POKE n+t,v/256

and to PEEK at the value in address n use the expression

PEEK(n) +PEEK(n+1)*256

if the value is known to be in the range 0 to 32767, and something like

LET MSB = PEEK(n+1)
IF MSB>127 THEN LET MSB = MSB-256
LET VALUE = PEEK(n) + MSB*256

if it may be negative, i.e. if n is 16412 or 16414. The notes at the left hand side of the table have the following meanings:

X The variable should not be altered by POKE as this could cause the BASIC to hang up.
N POKE will have no lasting effect, as the variable will be rewritten either at the end of the POKE statement or the next time "edit" mode is entered (either at the end of the run or to get some input).
1 or 2 number of bytes in variable.
U "unsigned" number in the range 0 to 65535; the BASIC will treat values in the range 32768 to 65535 as -32768 to -1 respectively. These are the only variables likely to yield negative values.

Notes Address Contents
1 16384 less than the "run-time error number": PEEK yields 255 normally, 1 less than the error code if an error has already occurred in this statement, eg PRINT (10^6 AND 0) OR PEEK (16384) prints 5 because 10**6 overflows. Do not POKE any value other than 255 or 0 to 8. POKE 16384,255 does nothing to 8) causes error n+1. Thus POKE 16384, 8 is the same as STOP.
X1 16385 sundry flags which control the BASIC system.
     
2 16386 Statement number of current statement: POKE has no effect unless this is the last line in the program
N2 16388 position in RAM of or cursor last line any input or editing was done
2 16390 Statement number of [>] cursor
X2

X2

X2

X2

X2
16392

16394

16396

16398

16400
VARS

E-LINE

D-LINE

DF-EA

DF-END
See section 2a of Appendix 2
X1 16402 number of lines in lower part of screen, including blank line separating the two parts
2 16403 statement number of first line on screen. The LIST statement sets this, and scrolling alters it
2 16405 address of character or token preceding the marker.
2 16407 statement number to which CONTINUE jumps
N1 16409 sundry flags which control the syntax analysis  
N2 16410 address of next item in syntax table (very unlikely to be useful).
U2 16412 "seed" for the random number generator. This is set by the RANDOMISE statement, q.v., and updated each time RND is called: see note below.
U2 16414 number of frames displayed since the ZX-80 was switched on (more exactly, the remainder when this is divided by 65536). While a picture is on the screen, this number is incremented 50 times per second in the UK version, 60 times per second in the US version.
N2 16416 address of 1st character of 1st variable name in last LET, INPUT, FOR, NEXT, or DIM statement. Thus in LET ABC= PEEK(16416) ABC is assigned the remainder when the address of the A is divided by 256. (Not likely to be very useful).
N2 16418 value of the last expression or variable: in practice this is the parameter of PEEK so that PEEK(16418) yields 34 and PEEK(16419) yields 64 always
X1 16420 position on line of next line character to be written to screen: 33 = lefthand column, 32 = second from left, etc, up to 2 = righthand column. Also, 1 = 1st column in next line because current line is full, 0 = 1st column on next line because end-of-line has been signalled. Thus after aPRINT not ending in a comma or a semi-colon PEEK(16420) always yields 0. It only yields 33 if the screen is empty (eg after CLS).
X1 16421 position of current line on screen: 23 = top line, 22 = second line down, etc.
X2 16422 address of the character after the closing bracket of the call of PEEK, or of the newline at the end of the POKE statement.

The first line of program begins at address 16424.

The function RND generates a pseudo-random number from the current "seed" as follows:

let n be the seed.
if n is zero, take n = 65536 instead.
let m be the remainder when n*77 is divided by 65537.
if m is 65536, take m = o instead.
the result of RND(x) is now x*m/65536. the new seed is m.

The TAB function in printing can be implemented as follows:

1000 REM GO SUB; 1050 TABS TO
1001 REM COLUMN I
1010 REM GO SUB 1040 TABS TO
1011 REM COLUMN I OUTPUTTING
1012 REM AT LEAST ONE SPACE
1030
1040 PRINT";
1050 IF I+PEEK(16420) =33 THEN RETURN
1060 IF I = 0 THEN IF PEEK(16420)<2 THEN RETURN
1070 GO TO 1040

INDEX    
ABS   91, 112
Addition   35
AND   50
Arithmetic overflow   36
Arrays   89
BASIC   15, 103
Bit   87
Brackets, use of   33
Branches   43
BREAK   83, 116
Byte   87
Character set   75, 116
CHR$(n)   75
CLEAR   89, 115
CLS   53, 115
CODE   77, 111
Codes (for different characters)   75
Commands   16
Command mode   23
Connections to tape recorder   11
Connection to television   9
CONTINUE   84, 113
Control character   71
Control variable   57
Current line pointer   26
Cursor   22, 104
keyword cursor   22, 104
letter cursor   22, 104
Cursor control keys   26, 103
DIM   89, 105
Display   9, 106
Display file   108
Division   36
EDIT   26
Element see Array    
Error codes (or messages)   25, 99
Expressions   35, 110
Expression evaluator   109
Field   71
Flowchart   32, 43
FOR..-TO   61, 115
GO SUB   64, 115
GOTO   47, 115
Graphics characters   78
HOME see Cursor control keys    
IF...THEN   48,113
INPUT   24, 113
Integer variables see Variables    
Iterative programs   57
Jumps   47
Keyboard   21, 22
Keyword   22, 105
LET   35
Line numbers   17
LIST   26, 114
LOAD   11, 112
Literal number   111
Literal string   71
Loops   61
Multiplication   35
NEW   22, 112
NEWLINE   23
NEXT   61, 115
NOT   50
Operators   35
arithmetic   35
relational   50
logical   50
OR   50
PEEK   88, 111
POKE   87, 115
Power connections   9
PRINT   71, 114
Priority (of operators)   37, 111
Program listing   26
RAM   103
RANDOMISE   87, 115
Recording programs on tape   11
REM   63
RETURN   64,115
RND   87, 112
RUBOUT   24, 105
RUN   23, 113
SAVE   11,113
SHIFT   22
SPACE   105, 110
Stack   107
Statement numbers see line numbers    
STOP   85, 114
String variables see Variables    
STR$   79
Subroutines   64
Subscripts   89
Subtraction   36
Syntax error marker   23, 104
System variables   107, 121
TL$   77
Token   22, 105
Truncation   36
USR   89, 112
Variables   17
integer variables   17, 111
string variables   17, 110
Zero confusion between letter O and number 0   22

Sinclair ZX Spectrum

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